nj car seat laws

nj car seat laws

Nj Car Seat Laws

Frequently Asked Questions Q – My son is 7 years old and is 58 inches tall. Is he required to ride in a booster seat? A – No. Although he is only 7 years old, he is over 57 inches tall and requires only a properly fitted seat belt. Q – My daughter is 8 years old but only weighs 76 pounds. Does she need a booster seat? A – No. Once a child is 8 years of age, s/he no longer needs to ride in a booster seat, but s/he must be secured in a properly adjusted seat belt. Note: While the children described above are exempt from the child restraint law, the seat belt may not fit them properly. The lap belt should lay across the child’s upper thigh (the pant’s pocket area) and across the chest and collar bone (so that it’s not cutting into the neck). Q – How can I determine if my child will be properly protected by the vehicle’s seat belt? A – Use the seat belt fit test on all children under 13 years of age to be sure they are big enough to safely use the adult seat belt without a booster seat. Have the child sit all the way back on the vehicle seat. Check to see if the knees bend naturally at the seat edge. If they do, continue the test. If they do not – the child should continue to ride in a booster seat. Buckle the lap and shoulder belt. Be sure the lap belt lies across the upper legs (the pant’s pocket area). If it lays across the upper thighs, move on to the next step. If it does not, the child should continue to ride in a booster seat. Be sure the shoulder belt lies on the shoulder or collarbone (and is not cutting into the neck). If it lies on the shoulder, move to the next step. If it is on the face or neck, the child should continue to ride in a booster seat. DO NOT place the shoulder belt under the arm or behind the child’s back! Be sure that your child can maintain the correct seating position for as long as you are in the car. If your child begins to slouch or shift position so the safety belt contacts the face, neck, or abdomen, the child should continue to ride a booster seat until all the steps can be met. Top
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Nj Car Seat Laws

Helmets Motorcycles Helmets are required for all riders. Bicycles Helmets are required for all riders and passengers who are under 17 years old. Cell Phones and Texting The use of hand-held cell phones is prohibited while driving. School bus drivers can use cell phones only during emergencies. Any drivers who holds a graduated license permit or a provisional license are prohibited from using a hands-free cell phone. Text messaging while driving is illegal. Child Car Seat Laws Kids under 8 years old who are less than 57 inches tall must ride in the backseat properly secured in a child safety seat or booster. If the vehicle does not have a backseat, the child may ride in the front while properly secured in an appropriate seat. Seat Belts All passengers who are at least 8 years old or 57 inches tall must wear a seatbelt. Reporting Drunk or Dangerous Drivers Call #77 (New Jersey’s Aggressive Driver System) if you suspect a driver of being drunk or a road threat. Provide the driver’s license plate number, vehicle make and model, location, and travel direction. Do not try to stop the vehicle on your own. Reporting Unattended Kids in Vehicles Notify authorities if you suspect an unattended child left in a vehicle is in danger from excessive heat or cold. Remain with the vehicle, if possible, until authorities arrive. Reporting Unattended Pets in Vehicles Call the local police department or animal control unit if you feel an unattended pet inside a vehicle is at risk.
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Nj Car Seat Laws

School buses: No car seats or boosters are required in school buses, which are exempt from the car seat law. However, school buses manufactured after October 1992 are required to be equipped with lap-type seat belts or other child restraint systems, according to the state Department of Education.
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Nj Car Seat Laws

The revised law, which went into effect one year ago Thursday, includes a new rule that requires toddlers under age 2 and 30 lbs. to remain in rear-facing car seats even if their legs are bent and their feet are pressed against the back seat of the car. Many other states allow parents to turn car seats around at age 1 so children are facing forward.
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Nj Car Seat Laws

Of those tickets, 6,257 were related to children under age 8 who were either unbuckled or in the wrong car seat or booster seat, according to the data. That is a 12 percent decrease compared to the same time period before the new law went into effect.
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Nj Car Seat Laws

Officials with the state Division of Highway Traffic Safety said it is difficult to determine why the number of tickets fell after the implementation of the new law. However, the division implemented a statewide campaign to inform parents, car dealers, hospitals, pediatricians and other groups about the new car seat rules last year, which may have helped cut down on violations.
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Nj Car Seat Laws

While the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that children stay in rear-facing car seats until they are 2, the New Jersey law has only mandated they face backwards until the age of 1. But that's all changed, according to a new law signed this month. The new rules, which take effect September 1, require babies to stay in rear-facing car seats with five-point harnesses until they’re 2 years old and weigh 30 pounds. Older kids must stay in five-point harness car seats or booster seats until they’re 8 years old and 57 inches tall. The just-passed state law is now in line with guidelines set forth by the AAP.
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Nj Car Seat Laws

The law, which begins Sept. 1, includes new regulations that require toddlers under age 2 and 30 lbs. to remain in rear-facing car seats. Older kids must remain in a booster seat until they are either age 8 or 57 inches tall.
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According to a report by NBC10, Gov. Chris Christie signed legislation back in May aimed at making vehicle travel safer for children in the state, including adding stricter requirements on the age and weight a child must reach in order to transition from a car seat to a seatbelt.
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So yes, even if your little one’s legs are long and seem to be squished up against the backseat, they still have to sit backwards in their car seats until they meet the law's age and size requirements. Once toddlers are turned around, they need to be in front-facing car seats with five-point harnesses until they’re 4 years old or weigh 40 pounds. They can then be moved to boosters.
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Source: “Child Passenger Safety Laws.” Governors Highway Safety Association. Updated September 2011. All of our lawyers are licensed to practice in the state of Pennsylvania. We also have lawyers licensed to practice in Ohio, and West Virginia and we associate with experienced attorneys in other states. The materials at this web site have been prepared by our Law Firm for information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice or legal opinion on any specific facts or circumstances. These materials do not, and are not, intended to constitute legal advice. Readers should not act upon this information without seeking professional counsel. The information provided at this site is subject to change without notice. Although we try to keep our site current and accurate, you should not rely on this information or its applicability to any specific circumstances without speaking with an attorney.
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Under the new law, parents with kids under age 2 and under 30 lbs. need to turn their car seats back around to be rear facing, even if the child seems uncomfortable, O’Connor said.
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Police handed out 113,662 tickets under the law that covers both car seats and seatbelts for adult passengers in the first 11 months since the changes were enacted last year, according to state Department of Law records. That is a 17 percent decrease in tickets compared to the same 11-month period the previous year.
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The number of tickets issued related to car seats and unbuckled children had already been falling before the new law went into effect. Between 2011 and 2015, the total number of tickets fell by about 20 percent, according to the state data.
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Under the new law, parents with kids under age 2 and under 30 lbs. need to turn their car seats back around to be rear facing, even if the child seems uncomfortable, O'Connor said. “It is the safest way to transport the child,”

Published on Jul 29, 2017 | Under Car | By michael ellis
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