most economical car

most economical car

Most Economical Car

For once, the Fiesta isn’t making the top of a list. It’s not the most efficient small car out there, but it remains Britain’s most loved car. Its versatile character and decent range of engines and trims make it appealing to many drivers. The most economical Fiesta sports a frugal 1.6-litre diesel engine, which offers enough grunt for a car this size.
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Most Economical Car

Its rock-bottom sticker price and thrifty fuel economy of 37 mpg overall conjure an inviting image of an economical runabout. But that mirage quickly dissipates when you drive this tiny, tinny car. Minor updates for 2017 bring a sedan body style, a hint more power, and Android Auto and Apple CarPlay, along with supposedly upgraded brakes. Yet those enhancements don’t mask the weak, vibrating three-cylinder engine that delivers sluggish acceleration and a raspy chorus of lament or the car’s clumsy handling. Though it’s relatively roomy, the depressing cabin feels drab, cheap, and insubstantial. In the end, there is no compelling reason to buy a Mirage and, for the money, there are many much better used cars for the same price.
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Most Economical Car

Citroën C4 Cactus SUV There’s no mistaking the Citroen C4 Cactus for anything else. With that bold styling and those huge ‘Airbumps’ – rubbery panels designed to protect against car-park dents – it looks like a concept car for the road. Yet behind the extrovert looks lies a spacious and practical interior. It’s cheap to buy, too. Citroen has worked hard to make the Cactus as light as possible and that in turn improves fuel consumption. You can choose from a 1.2-litre petrol, which is surprisingly smooth on a long motorway jaunt. But here we’re more interested in the 1.6-litre BlueHDi model, which is capable of a very impressive 83.1mpg and CO2 emissions of less than 90 grams per kilometre. Some cars might be more economical, but none offers such a great blend of looks, space and an affordable price tag. Do note the heating and air-conditioning controls are accessed via a touchscreen, and this is far fiddlier to use than physical dials and knobs. Read more.Key points 4.7 / 5 Price £13,400 – £20,865 read review watch video
most economical car 3

Most Economical Car

Its rock-bottom sticker price and thrifty fuel economy of 37 mpg overall conjure an inviting image of an economical runabout. But that mirage quickly dissipates when you drive this tiny, tinny car. Minor updates for 2017 bring a sedan body style, a hint more power, and Android Auto and Apple CarPlay, along with supposedly upgraded brakes. Yet those enhancements don’t mask the weak, vibrating three-cylinder engine that delivers sluggish acceleration and a raspy chorus of lament or the car’s clumsy handling. Though it’s relatively roomy, the depressing cabin feels drab, cheap, and insubstantial. In the end, there is no compelling reason to buy a Mirage and, for the money, there are many much better used cars for the same price. Read the complete Mitsubishi Mirage road test.
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Most Economical Car

There’s no mistaking the Citroen C4 Cactus for anything else. With that bold styling and those huge ‘Airbumps’ – rubbery panels designed to protect against car-park dents – it looks like a concept car for the road. Yet behind the extrovert looks lies a spacious and practical interior. It’s cheap to buy, too. Citroen has worked hard to make the Cactus as light as possible and that in turn improves fuel consumption. You can choose from a 1.2-litre petrol, which is surprisingly smooth on a long motorway jaunt. But here we’re more interested in the 1.6-litre BlueHDi model, which is capable of a very impressive 83.1mpg and CO2 emissions of less than 90 grams per kilometre. Some cars might be more economical, but none offers such a great blend of looks, space and an affordable price tag. Do note the heating and air-conditioning controls are accessed via a touchscreen, and this is far fiddlier to use than physical dials and knobs. Read more.
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Most Economical Car

Despite having a True MPG score that's almost 35% away from its manufacturer claim, the Renault Megane is still a very economical family car. Every model gets plenty of standard equipment, and this small diesel engine has nice mid-range pace. With low CO2 emissions it's also the option of choice for company car buyers.
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Most Economical Car

Toyota Prius hatchback Think of a hybrid and it’s more than likely the Toyota Prius will be the first car to pop into your head. That’s because it was the world’s first mass-produced hybrid and has become the poster boy for the hybrid movement. The latest Prius is an easy car to live with, too, thanks to a pleasantly large boot and the quiet motoring you’d expect from such a car. Just a firm ride and limited rear passenger space count against it. As well as the Prius hybrid, which can achieve 94.1mpg, with CO2 emissions of just 70g/km, there’s also a Prius Plug-In Hybrid. This version is significantly more expensive even after the government’s £2,500 plug-in car grant has been deducted. Toyota claims 134.5mpg is possible and it can travel up to 15.5 miles on a full charge from a household socket. But as with the other plug-in hybrids here, your mileage will vary. Even so, for drivers with short daily commutes, the Prius Plug-In will be an exceptionally cheap car to run. Read more.Key points 4.1 / 5 Price £24,115 – £33,895 read review watch video
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Most Economical Car

Think of a hybrid and it’s more than likely the Toyota Prius will be the first car to pop into your head. That’s because it was the world’s first mass-produced hybrid and has become the poster boy for the hybrid movement. The latest Prius is an easy car to live with, too, thanks to a pleasantly large boot and the quiet motoring you’d expect from such a car. Just a firm ride and limited rear passenger space count against it. As well as the Prius hybrid, which can achieve 94.1mpg, with CO2 emissions of just 70g/km, there’s also a Prius Plug-In Hybrid. This version is significantly more expensive even after the government’s £2,500 plug-in car grant has been deducted. Toyota claims 134.5mpg is possible and it can travel up to 15.5 miles on a full charge from a household socket. But as with the other plug-in hybrids here, your mileage will vary. Even so, for drivers with short daily commutes, the Prius Plug-In will be an exceptionally cheap car to run. Read more.
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The first step to having lower running costs, is finding a car with great fuel consumption. But finding the right one can be confusing. Especially when every car manufacturer quotes astronomically high figures for their cars’ miles per gallon (mpg). According to a report by Nextgreencar.com, there has been a continually widening gap between real mpg and official manufacturers’ claims. By 2013, the difference between official test figures and real-world driving has increased to 31%, from just 8% in 2001. Our round-up is based on real-life mpg, which is a lot closer to what you’ll experience on the road. Each car offers its own appealing mix of practicality, decent running costs and refinement. Here are the most fuel-efficient cars you can own:
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Economy cars for the frugal 1 of 10 The cheapest economy cars to buy aren’t always the cheapest to own. Automotive consumer website Edmunds.com assembled a 2015 list of cheap cars to own for Bankrate, based on the website’s true cost of ownership, or TCO, calculator. Compare auto loan rates in your area The ranking includes many factors — such as purchase price, fuel economy, depreciation, maintenance and repairs — that affect the total cost of ownership. Although the true cost of ownership provides an idea of a car’s ownership cost over its first 5 years when driving 15,000 miles per year, the results are based on averages. It’s a tool for comparing the total ownership cost of 1 model with another. Your actual experience may be different. Here are 9 of the cheapest economy cars to own, beginning with the most expensive cost of ownership and ending with the least expensive. Edmunds included the destination fee in the base prices. After choosing a car to buy, you’re ready to shop for a car loan. First check your credit score for free at myBankrate Previous Next 1 of 10
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Published on Jul 19, 2017 | Under Car | By michael ellis
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