monte carlo car

monte carlo car

Monte Carlo Car

The Chevrolet Monte Carlo traces its roots back several decades to the height of the muscle car era, when Chevy sought to entice customers with a sporty, upscale rear-drive V8 coupe that provided a balance of performance and comfort in a stylish package. From those early years — which included big-block SS (Super Sport) editions — the Monte Carlo evolved toward a more luxury-oriented persona, saw significant downsizing (to optimize fuel efficiency) and soldiered on as a popular rear-drive sport coupe until 1988, when it was replaced by the Lumina coupe.Following a lengthy hiatus, the Chevy Monte Carlo emerged once again in 1995. However, by then it had been softened and saddled with a carryover front-wheel-drive platform and V6 engines that barely hinted at the performance of years gone by. It was, in essence, a Lumina coupe.The current-generation Chevrolet Monte Carlo coupe debuted in 2000 with more distinctive styling and updated underpinnings from the Impala sedan to better meet the needs of today’s buyers. Significant changes in 2006 helped the Monte Carlo come nearly full circle back to its original mission with sportier chassis tuning, improved driving dynamics and more power in SS models, while freshened interior and exterior styling offer a sculpted and pleasing contemporary appearance. In spite of those updates, sales remained sluggish and the Monte Carlo was gone after the 2007 model year. Although much improved in its latter years — including a return to available V8 power in SS trim — we feel that other performance sport coupe competitors like the Mustang offer a more satisfying choice as long as you don’t mind giving up some interior room. In reviews, our editors felt that the Monte Carlo was primarily a comfortable cruiser more at home in the fast lane than on twisty mountain roads. If the latter is your preferred driving environment, you may want to consider other brighter, more focused alternatives.Most Recent Chevrolet Monte CarloThe Chevrolet Monte Carlo received a major update for the 2006 model year and it remained a midsize two-door coupe that came in three trim levels: the base but reasonably well-equipped LS, the more upscale LT and the performance-oriented SS. Under the hood of LS and LT models is a 3.5-liter V6 with 211 horsepower, while the SS boasts a responsive 5.3-liter V8 with 303 hp. Impressive numbers, yes. But they would’ve been even better if they powered the rear wheels like Monte Carlos of years ago, especially in the case of the SS. A front-engine/rear-drive layout is typically preferable for optimum weight distribution and balanced handling, especially when the engine is a heavy V8.Overall, this version of the Chevy Monte Carlo, which only lasted through ’07, was a spacious sport coupe that offered buyers a reasonably good comfort/performance trade-off for a relatively low sticker price. Although quick in a straight line, the V8-equipped Monte Carlo SS suffers from a nose-heavy feel. If quick reflexes are on your wish list instead and you don’t mind tighter passenger quarters, we suggest you consider a smaller but more nimble sport coupe, such as an Acura RSX or Mitsubishi Eclipse.Past Chevrolet Monte Carlo ModelsUsed-car shoppers interested in a late-model Monte Carlo will likely encounter the previous-generation model, which was available from the 2000-’05 model years. Based on the then-new Impala platform and wearing fresh, distinctive (some said ugly) sheet metal with heritage styling cues, the Monte Carlo was originally offered as an LS with a 3.4-liter V6 engine making 180 hp, or an SS with a 200-hp 3.8-liter V6. A driver side airbag — as well as traction control and OnStar on SS models — was added as standard safety equipment in 2001, and all models received four-wheel disc brakes, traction control and remote keyless entry in 2003. In a bid to boost its performance image, Chevrolet added a 240-hp supercharged engine option for the SS in 2004.Previous to this model, there was the Lumina-based Monte Carlo, which became available for the 1995 model year in LS or Z34 sport trim levels. Those wishing to hit the fast lane are advised to stick with the 210-hp 3.4-liter twincam V6 in the Z34. Detail improvements carried the Monte Carlo through the next several years, though only the most eagle-eyed used-car shoppers are likely to appreciate the differences. If you are looking for older years, visit our used Chevrolet Monte Carlo page.
monte carlo car 1

Monte Carlo Car

The body was restyled with the other GM mid-size formal coupes (Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme, Pontiac Grand Prix, Buick Regal). It featured a smoother profile than the previous models and new vertical taillights similar to the 1973–1977 models. Engine offerings were carried over, including the standard 229 CID Chevrolet V6 (231 CID Buick V6 in California) an optional 267 CID V8 (not available in California), a 305 CID V8 in the base and Landau models, and a turbocharged 170 hp (130 kW) 231 CID Buick V6 in the Monte Carlo Turbo. There were a total of 3,027 Monte Carlo Turbos for 1981. This would make the Monte Carlo Turbo one of the rarest Monte Carlos built, even rarer than the 1987 Monte Carlo SS Aerocoupe. The Monte Carlo Turbo appeared slightly different from other Monte Carlos that year because in addition to the turbo motor it also was equipped with a small hood scoop on the left side of the hood. It also had Turbo 3.8 badges with Chevrolet bowtie on the sides of the hood scoop, on the trunk lid, and on the right side of the dash. An automatic transmission, power steering and power front disc brakes were standard equipment. While this car was considered by some to be much better looking (and appeared more aerodynamic) than its Buick Regal, Pontiac Grand Prix, and Olds Cutlass cousins, only one team tried to make a go of it in NASCAR cup racing. While the big Monte Carlo was the dominant body style in the late 1970s, winning 30 or so races, the downsized (and cleaned-up) 1981 body would only take three checkered flags in the 1981 and 1982 seasons when it was run.
monte carlo car 2

Monte Carlo Car

The SS 454 package would be discontinued after this year following production of only 1,919 units, but the 454 CID V8 engine would remain optional in Monte Carlos through 1975. The reason given for discontinuing the SS was that the Monte Carlo was marketed as a luxury vehicle instead of a muscle car. The SS nameplate would be resurrected 12 years later. Yet, at the same time that the Monte Carlo SS was judged a failure in the marketplace and discontinued, the Monte’s reputation as a performance car on the race track was gaining strength because Ford and Chrysler were ending their factory-backed racing support due to declining muscle car sales and the need to divert dollars to meet costly Federal safety and emission regulations (General Motors’ official policy had prohibited factory racing efforts since 1963). As factory support ended at Ford and Chrysler, the stock-car racing mantle switched to independent teams and sponsors, who overwhelmingly chose Chevrolets over Ford and Chrysler products due to Chevy’s much greater availability and affordability of over-the-counter racing parts through the Chevy dealer network. The Monte Carlo was considered the best suited Chevrolet model for stock car racing by most NASCAR teams due to its 116 in (2,900 mm) wheelbase (only one inch above NASCAR’s minimum requirements at that time, the Chevelle 2-doors had a shorter 112-inch wheelbase) and long-hood design which placed the engine further back in the chassis than most other vehicles for better weight traction. Thus the Monte Carlo became Chevy’s standard-bearer for NASCAR from 1971 to 1989.
monte carlo car 3

Monte Carlo Car

For 2000, Chevrolet not only again called upon GM Motorsports for design inspiration, but also to Monte Carlos of the past. Among the traits carried over from older Monte Carlos were the stylized wheel flares, vertically oriented tail lamps, and a stylized rear bumper. Another classic trait for 2000 was the return of the “Knight” badging, as well as a full gauge cluster, not seen on the Monte Carlo since 1988. Back again was the Super Sport moniker, replacing the Z34 designation of the fifth generation, which was a Lumina Coupe legacy. At the request of racing teams, Chevrolet stylists added a slight “hump” on the rear trunk – similar to, although smaller than, a Lincoln Mark VIII. It was a distinct trait that stayed with Monte Carlo until its demise, even though later in the generation every trim level would get a spoiler that all but masked the hump. From the NASCAR circuit came the aerodynamic styling and duck tail spoiler. The 6th Generation Monte Carlo Is Based on The Monte Carlo Intimidator Concept.
monte carlo car 4

Monte Carlo Car

This was the last year for the fourth-generation Monte Carlo. The 1988 models were actually built in late 1987, with only 16,204 SSs made for an asking price of US$19,320. Appearance and mechanicals were similar to the 1987 model. The 1988 model only came with the lay-down style spoiler, unlike the 1987 model, which came with either the lay-down or stand-up type spoiler. The Aerocoupe did not return, as Chevrolet had unveiled plans to produce the Lumina and race that body style in NASCAR. The new Lumina body style was much more aerodynamic and negated the need for a “sleeker” version of the Monte Carlo SS. The Lumina coupe was introduced as a 1990 model to replace the Monte Carlo. Total production numbers for the final year of the rear-wheel drive Monte Carlo was 30,174 — almost half of the 1987 numbers.

Monte Carlo Car

Monte Carlo Car
Monte Carlo Car

Published on Mar 25, 2017 | Under Car | By michael ellis
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