mark hamill car crash

mark hamill car crash

Mark Hamill Car Crash

Hamill’s role as the Joker began in the 1992 series Batman: The Animated Series and continued to many later spin-off series, video games and films. Hamill had initially played a guest voice role as corrupt businessman Ferris Boyle in the episode “Heart of Ice.” Out of curiosity from the show’s executives, they had Hamill audition for the role of Joker, after the previous choice Tim Curry was moved out by the company because the executives wanted to hear something new. After Hamill received word that he had earned the role, he experienced an initial panic due to the fact that he wanted to voice a character who “nobody had preconceived notions about,” such as legendary Batman villains Clayface and Dr. Hugo Strange, and because the role of the Joker was too “high profile” in his mind for him to please everyone with his rendition. His portrayal has garnered significant acclaim; the most prominent feature of it is his dynamic use of laughter to express the Joker’s mood. Hamill referred to Joker’s laugh as being like a musical instrument and would practice laughing maniacally while driving to recording sessions. Hamill received critical acclaim for his performance, which put him in high demand as a voice over actor of cartoon villains.
mark hamill car crash 1

Mark Hamill Car Crash

Seemingly, no it wasn’t On the DVD commentary for The Empire Strikes Back, George Lucas denied that the Wampa scene was created to address Hamill’s injuries, noting that the scene had been written some time earlier. From IMDB However, George Lucas explains in the DVD commentary that this attack was merely to keep the audience interested while the Empire searched for the Rebels and to introduce Obi-Wan Kenobi’s Force ghost and, by extension, Yoda. From a different section of IMDB An oft-quoted myth is that the Wampa attack on Luke was devised to explain the actual scars on Mark Hamill’s face because he had been involved in a car crash and had to have reconstructive surgery. Hamill did indeed survive a serious car crash in January 1977 but did not have any visible scars by the time Empire began filming over two years later From BusinessInsider quoting George from the Bluray Commentary “At the end of ‘A New Hope’ he had been in a car accident and I knew Mark was going to look a little different than he was in the first film,” said George Lucas in the Blu-ray commentary of “The Empire Strikes Back.” “But my feeling was some time had past, they have been in the Rebellion fighting, that kind of thing, so the change was justifiable. There’s a scene in the film where Mark gets beat up by the monster , which helps even more, but that wasn’t really the meaning of why we wrote the monster in the beginning. We needed something to keep the film suspenseful at the beginning while the Empire is looking for them.” (Above) Left is A New Hope and Right is Empire Strikes Back (Below) His scars are however a lot more prevalent in this scene of Empire Strikes Back. Hamil addressed this in a recent youtube interview he did. they used a lot of the real scars to build upon So there you have it, if the scars looked real it’s because the make-up department used his existing scars to create a more realistic aesthetic for the fake scars.
mark hamill car crash 2

Mark Hamill Car Crash

That’s an interesting theory (the facial damage being downplayed) but I don’t see the logic in it. What would either Lucasfilm or Mr. Hamill’s PR people have to gain by hiding or downplaying the injuries? “The Empire Strikes Back” was the sequel to the biggest film ever made. It did not depend on Hamill’s star power or his appearance to draw in audiences. It’s not like people were not going to go see it because they heard Hamill looked different. Indeed, that might actually increase buzz for the picture, not hurt it. Indeed, even if his injuries were extremely noticeable, what incentive would Mark Hamill have to hide it? He wasn’t disfigured or anything even remotely close. He went on to have a successful acting career, especially on Broadway, so the results of the crash have obviously had no significant effect on his bankability as a star (beyond his somewhat questionable ability to carry the lead in a blockbuster picture, which obviously has far more to do with his acting ability than the appearance of his face). It’s much more logical that the crash was what it was, his face healed and he got on with his life, than it is that he or anybody else was trying to hide anything about it. There’s simply nothing to hide here and no reason to do so.
mark hamill car crash 3

Mark Hamill Car Crash

Sean Munger // December 21, 2014 at 2:21 pm // That’s an interesting theory (the facial damage being downplayed) but I don’t see the logic in it. What would either Lucasfilm or Mr. Hamill’s PR people have to gain by hiding or downplaying the injuries? “The Empire Strikes Back” was the sequel to the biggest film ever made. It did not depend on Hamill’s star power or his appearance to draw in audiences. It’s not like people were not going to go see it because they heard Hamill looked different. Indeed, that might actually increase buzz for the picture, not hurt it. Indeed, even if his injuries were extremely noticeable, what incentive would Mark Hamill have to hide it? He wasn’t disfigured or anything even remotely close. He went on to have a successful acting career, especially on Broadway, so the results of the crash have obviously had no significant effect on his bankability as a star (beyond his somewhat questionable ability to carry the lead in a blockbuster picture, which obviously has far more to do with his acting ability than the appearance of his face). It’s much more logical that the crash was what it was, his face healed and he got on with his life, than it is that he or anybody else was trying to hide anything about it. There’s simply nothing to hide here and no reason to do so.
mark hamill car crash 4

Mark Hamill Car Crash

That aside, you make a mistake with respect to the video you post in your update at the end, where Hamill discusses the crash in an interview. You mistakeningly state that in the interview Hamill is saying that the doctor after the crash used existing scars on Hamill’s face to repair it. You also misquote the precise words Hamill says in the recording.
mark hamill car crash 5

Mark Hamill Car Crash

For over a year prior to the announcement, both Disney and Hamill were coy about whether he would be a cast member. In September 2013, Robert Englund, actor and long-time friend of Hamill, said that Hamill was currently working out in the gym. Englund stated “Mark now – they’ve got Mark in the gym because Mark’s coming back as Luke Skywalker. They’ve got him doing his sit-ups.” It was previously reported that both Hamill and Fisher had been assigned nutritionists and personal trainers to work with ahead of production.
mark hamill car crash 6

Mark Hamill Car Crash

On January 11, 1977, before shooting one of his scenes in Star Wars, Hamill was in a car accident in which he fractured his nose and left cheekbone, requiring seven hours of surgery. As a result, a double was used for the landspeeder pickup shots. According to Hamill in a recorded interview, he was driving his BMW on a freeway, became distracted, and seeing that he was missing his offramp, attempted to negotiate four lanes of traffic. Some real scars from the crash appear on Luke’s face in The Empire Strikes Back. Hamill later said that the stories surrounding his injuries had become exaggerated. Confirming that he had only broken his nose, Hamill observed that “over the years it’s built up into having my face reconstructed with plastic surgery.”
mark hamill car crash 7

Mark Hamill Car Crash

Hamill has commented that if there would ever be an animated version of Batman: The Killing Joke, he would gladly voice the Joker again, encouraging fans to campaign for said adaptation. On July 17, 2015, Hamill tweeted that he had his fingers crossed in hopes that he would be contacted to reprise his role as the Joker in the animated adaptation. On July 27, Collider reported that Hamill will voice the Joker in the film. The film was released in theaters for a two-day limited time. It was released on Digital HD on July 27, 2016. It was released on DVD and Blu-Ray on August 2. Positive reception was met for Mark Hamill’s performance as the Joker, with some citing it as his best performance of the character.
mark hamill car crash 8

Readers of this blog continue to argue with me as if I’m utterly blind not to see any significant difference between Hamill’s appearance in 1976 (when Star Wars was filmed) and post-1977. The composite photo that appears at the top of this article compares two views of his face–but if you will read closely, what I said was that I don’t see any significant difference other than would be accounted for by aging and other normal changes. If there is a difference between how Mr. Hamill looked in 1978 and how he did in 1976, I would say that his eyes look “rounder” and his face looks fuller in the later period than he did previously. But this is also true of me–and the change occurred in my mid-to-late 20s, the exact same age at which a similar change occurred in Mr. Hamill’s appearance, and I did not have a “disfiguring” car crash. Also you’ll notice that at times in the screen test video his eyes also have that “rounder” appearance. I really don’t think the facial changes attributable to the crash are very significant. If the YouTube videos I posted don’t demonstrate that, I don’t know what will.

Published on Jul 19, 2017 | Under Car | By michael ellis
please edit your menu