how to tow a car

how to tow a car

How To Tow A Car

01 of 05 About Tow Straps, Hooks and Cables Properly attaching your tow strap is crucial. Matt Wright A tow strap can be very useful in getting you out of a fix. If you get stuck, a tow strap (or cable) can be the saving grace that takes you 10 feet to solid ground. If your car breaks down, it might be safe to use a tow strap to get the car to a safer place so you can have it towed or make a repair. Used correctly, a tow strap (basically a strong nylon strap with hooks on each end) can be a life saver. Use incorrectly and you can cause damage to your car, or maybe worse. Safety First!  Due to many responses to this article, I want to address the issue of a tow strap versus a tow chain. At first glance, they appear to be similar tools that do similar things. By design, they are just that. Both are used to attach to two vehicles, one being used to pull the other. But the practical reality of the tow chain versus the tow strap is huge. If you have access to these two tools, I urge you to pick one of them up, then the other. Feel how much heavier the tow chain is than the tow strap. You may think that the chain is much stronger, but the weight of these two tools isn't relevant to their strength. If they're in good condition, the chain and strap have a fairly equal chance of breaking, which is small. That being said, there's always a chance either could fail. More likely than breaking, both hooked devices have a chance of slipping free of their attachment points. This is where the difference in weight can make a huge, well, difference!  If you experience any type of failure with the strap or chain, it will likely be while they're under tremendous strain as you try to pull the disabled vehicle. It's at this point that both the materials — the nylon strap and the steel chain — and the placement of the hooks are most vulnerable. If something slips or breaks, there's a good chance the free end will come flying toward the still attached end. If it's a nylon strap, you'll have far less weight hurtling toward you, which is ultimately safer. 
how to tow a car 1

How To Tow A Car

Properly attaching your tow strap is crucial. Matt Wright A tow strap can be very useful in getting you out of a fix. If you get stuck, a tow strap (or cable) can be the saving grace that takes you 10 feet to solid ground. If your car breaks down, it might be safe to use a tow strap to get the car to a safer place so you can have it towed or make a repair. Used correctly, a tow strap (basically a strong nylon strap with hooks on each end) can be a life saver. Use incorrectly and you can cause damage to your car, or maybe worse. Safety First!  Due to many responses to this article, I want to address the issue of a tow strap versus a tow chain. At first glance, they appear to be similar tools that do similar things. By design, they are just that. Both are used to attach to two vehicles, one being used to pull the other. But the practical reality of the tow chain versus the tow strap is huge. If you have access to these two tools, I urge you to pick one of them up, then the other. Feel how much heavier the tow chain is than the tow strap. You may think that the chain is much stronger, but the weight of these two tools isn't relevant to their strength. If they're in good condition, the chain and strap have a fairly equal chance of breaking, which is small. That being said, there's always a chance either could fail. More likely than breaking, both hooked devices have a chance of slipping free of their attachment points. This is where the difference in weight can make a huge, well, difference!  If you experience any type of failure with the strap or chain, it will likely be while they're under tremendous strain as you try to pull the disabled vehicle. It's at this point that both the materials — the nylon strap and the steel chain — and the placement of the hooks are most vulnerable. If something slips or breaks, there's a good chance the free end will come flying toward the still attached end. If it's a nylon strap, you'll have far less weight hurtling toward you, which is ultimately safer. 
how to tow a car 2

How To Tow A Car

Contents 1 Tow Your Car 2 Can you tow a car if the power steering doesn’t work? 3 Warnings 4 Tips for the Driver of the Towed Car 5 Questions and Answers 5.1 How to attach the towing rope without a towing eye? 5.2 If you are towing a car with a towrope, do you have to have a special license? 5.3 Can you just put a sign that says towed vehicle on a car, instead of towing lights? 5.4 My car was towed, and now there is no power steering. Why? 5.5 How to tow a car with no towing eye? 5.6 How does hydraulic steering work? 5.7 How does power steering works? 5.8 Where do I attach chain on the front of a ’94 Accord to tow it to the car shop? 5.9 Flat towing smart car backwards using rear tow hooks? 5.10 How much damage can be incurred during towing? 5.11 Is 20,000 lbs. max enough for a towing strap? 5.12 Hi, when towing a car behind an RV, do you have to have the keys in the ignition and if you don’t, what will happen? 5.13 Can a Ford 1997 Ranger with manual transmission tow a 2005 Volkswagen Beetle? 5.14 How do I tow a 2006 Honda accord sedan with a tow rope? 6 Referencing this Article 7 Comments
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How To Tow A Car

A U-Haul patented design, the tow dolly is considered top of the line for vehicle towing. It is a perfect low cost option to transport vehicles for either in-town or long distance moves. Tow dolly trailers are available for rent either behind a U-Haul moving truck or behind your own tow capable vehicle. Reserve your car trailer with U-Haul today! U-Haul car dolly rentals can tow most FWD vehicles and many RWD vehicles. When towing a RWD vehicle on a tow dolly, you must disconnect the driveshaft, please refer to your owner’s manual prior to loading and towing a vehicle. When towing with a personal tow vehicle, the tow dolly requires either a 1-7/8” or 2” hitch ball as well as an appropriately rated hitch. During the reservation process, U-Haul will provide an exact recommendation for your particular vehicle combination. We suggest watching this short five minute video on How to Load your Car on a U-Haul Car Towing Dolly to ensure a stress-free loading process and towing experience.
how to tow a car 4

How To Tow A Car

Another method for towing a vehicle is to use a tow bar. Tow bars allow all four wheels of the towed vehicle to rest on the ground while moving. When using a tow bar, you need to disconnect the driveshaft to keep from damaging the transmission. Most often, tow bars are used in tandem with an RV to tow a vehicle for use while traveling cross country. Warning: Using a tow bar requires that you attach brackets to the front frame of the towed vehicle. If you do not feel comfortable doing this yourself, have an expert mechanic or auto body technician attach the brackets for you.
how to tow a car 5

How To Tow A Car

Due to many responses to this article, I want to address the issue of a tow strap versus a tow chain. At first glance, they appear to be similar tools that do similar things. By design, they are just that. Both are used to attach to two vehicles, one being used to pull the other. But the practical reality of the tow chain versus the tow strap is huge. If you have access to these two tools, I urge you to pick one of them up, then the other. Feel how much heavier the tow chain is than the tow strap. You may think that the chain is much stronger, but the weight of these two tools isn't relevant to their strength. If they're in good condition, the chain and strap have a fairly equal chance of breaking, which is small. That being said, there's always a chance either could fail. More likely than breaking, both hooked devices have a chance of slipping free of their attachment points. This is where the difference in weight can make a huge, well, difference! 
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How To Tow A Car

04 of 05 Pulling With The Tow Strap Pull the strap tight before you start to pull the car. photo by Matt Wright, 2008 Now that you have both ends securely hooked in, you're ready to pull. There are a couple of things to remember: Never pull an unattended vehicle with a tow strap.Never use a tow strap to tow at highway speeds.Smooth is the word of the moment (as in not jerky). With both vehicles manned, slowly creep the pulling vehicle forward until the tow strap is tight. Don't try to get a running start, that's not how this works. Once the strap is tight, you can begin to pull the other vehicle. Remember to keep all of your movements nice and slow. Anything abrupt will be felt doubly by the car you're pulling.

Published on Apr 23, 2017 | Under Car | By michael ellis
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