carly fiorina education

carly fiorina education

Carly Fiorina Education

Steers toward business Businesswoman Carly Fiorina was born Cara Carleton Sneed on September 6, 1954, in Austin, Texas. Her unique name was the result of family tradition. All the male members of the Sneed family who were named Carleton died while serving in the Civil War (1861–1865). To honor them, one child in each subsequent generation was named either Carleton (if a boy) or Cara Carleton (if a girl). Fiorina's father, Joseph Sneed, was a lawyer and at one time served as deputy attorney general under President Richard M. Nixon (1913–1994). He also served for more than thirty years as an appeals court judge in San Francisco, California. Fiorina's mother, Madelon, was an abstract painter. In 2003, during a ceremony honoring her father's longstanding career, Fiorina credited her parents for inspiring her to excel. “In times of hardship and uncertainty,” she observed, as quoted on the OCE Public Information Office Web site, “people need a strong internal compass to find their way.” Fiorina specifically thanked her father for “always being my true north.” “Progress is not made by the cynics and doubters. It is made by those who believe everything is possible.” Although Fiorina was raised primarily in the San Francisco Bay area, her father's job caused the family to move quite a bit. She attended at least five high schools all over the world, including Ghana (in Africa) and London, England. Fiorina eventually returned to California to attend Stanford University, located in Palo Alto. Strangely enough, Hewlett-Packard's corporate headquarters are located in Palo Alto, and the future CEO worked in HP's shipping department during a summer break from college. After graduating with a degree in medieval history and philosophy, Fiorina decided to follow in her father's footsteps. She entered law school at the University of California at Los Angeles in 1976. After one semester, however, she dropped out, deciding that a career in law was not for her. Do You Want to Be Carly Fiorina? Carly Fiorina has graced the top of Fortune magazine's annual list of the most powerful women in business since the ranking was launched in 1998. But in October of 2003, when the magazine polled the other honorees and asked them whether they would like to be in Fiorina's shoes, the answer was consistently “no.” Many seemed uncomfortable with the word power. As Ann Fudge, CEO of Young & Rubicam (and number 46 on the list), told Fortune, “We need to redefine power!” And according to Jenny Ming, president of Old Navy, “Power is in your face and aggressive. I'm not like that.” Definitions aside, according to Fortune, by the mid-2000s the trend was that women were regularly being offered positions of power but were not accepting them. And more and more women were leaving their top-level positions or taking short- or long-term breaks. One reason cited was that women were not willing to sacrifice their personal lives, especially time with their children, in order to work a staggering number of hours at their companies. As Jamie Gorelick, former vice chairman of Fannie Mae, commented to Fortune , the “secret is that women demand a lot more satisfaction in their lives than men do.” Of course it makes it a lot easier to devote time to a career if one spouse stays at home. Interestingly enough, according to Fortune, more than one-third of the women who appeared on the list in 2003 had husbands who were stay-at-home dads. In fact, Carly Fiorina's husband Frank, a former AT&T executive, took an early retirement in 1998 to help focus his energies on his wife's career. Not only were women turning down or leaving upper level positions in the business world, but business schools were having a difficult time attracting female students. According to a 2002 study by Simmons College of over four thousand teenagers, only 9 percent of girls interviewed expressed an interest in going into business. In addition, women made up only 36 percent of students heading toward a master's degree in business administration (MBA). As Judy Rodin, president of the University of Pennsylvania, explained, young women on her campus regularly commented that “You women work too hard. You're too strung out.” Considering that Carly Fiorina starts her day every morning at 4:00, maybe they are right. Fortune did offer some hope. Young men appeared to be changing their attitudes toward the business world. They, like women, seemed to want a balance between their personal lives and their careers. According to Brenda Barnes, who teaches at the Kellogg School of Management in Chicago, her students have told her that they saw their parents “dedicating themselves to their companies” and that they are not willing to “give their lives over to their jobs.” Women executives see this as good news. They predict that if business attitudes change, equality between men and women in the top business spots may become a reality. That reality may be some time coming, however, considering that in 2003 only 8 percent of the top level jobs in corporate America were held by women. Not sure what to do, Fiorina tried her hand at a number of jobs. She even taught English in Bologna, Italy. It was while working as a receptionist at a New York brokerage firm that her interest in business was sparked. Fiorina decided to go back to school to get a master's degree in business administration (MBA), and in 1980 she graduated from the University of Maryland. Fresh out of graduate school, Fiorina landed a job at the telecommunications giant AT&T as a sales representative. She was quickly promoted to the position of commercial account executive, and was responsible for selling long distance telephone service to federal agencies in the U.S. government.
carly fiorina education 1

Carly Fiorina Education

Do You Want to Be Carly Fiorina? Carly Fiorina has graced the top of Fortune magazine's annual list of the most powerful women in business since the ranking was launched in 1998. But in October of 2003, when the magazine polled the other honorees and asked them whether they would like to be in Fiorina's shoes, the answer was consistently “no.” Many seemed uncomfortable with the word power. As Ann Fudge, CEO of Young & Rubicam (and number 46 on the list), told Fortune, “We need to redefine power!” And according to Jenny Ming, president of Old Navy, “Power is in your face and aggressive. I'm not like that.” Definitions aside, according to Fortune, by the mid-2000s the trend was that women were regularly being offered positions of power but were not accepting them. And more and more women were leaving their top-level positions or taking short- or long-term breaks. One reason cited was that women were not willing to sacrifice their personal lives, especially time with their children, in order to work a staggering number of hours at their companies. As Jamie Gorelick, former vice chairman of Fannie Mae, commented to Fortune , the “secret is that women demand a lot more satisfaction in their lives than men do.” Of course it makes it a lot easier to devote time to a career if one spouse stays at home. Interestingly enough, according to Fortune, more than one-third of the women who appeared on the list in 2003 had husbands who were stay-at-home dads. In fact, Carly Fiorina's husband Frank, a former AT&T executive, took an early retirement in 1998 to help focus his energies on his wife's career. Not only were women turning down or leaving upper level positions in the business world, but business schools were having a difficult time attracting female students. According to a 2002 study by Simmons College of over four thousand teenagers, only 9 percent of girls interviewed expressed an interest in going into business. In addition, women made up only 36 percent of students heading toward a master's degree in business administration (MBA). As Judy Rodin, president of the University of Pennsylvania, explained, young women on her campus regularly commented that “You women work too hard. You're too strung out.” Considering that Carly Fiorina starts her day every morning at 4:00, maybe they are right. Fortune did offer some hope. Young men appeared to be changing their attitudes toward the business world. They, like women, seemed to want a balance between their personal lives and their careers. According to Brenda Barnes, who teaches at the Kellogg School of Management in Chicago, her students have told her that they saw their parents “dedicating themselves to their companies” and that they are not willing to “give their lives over to their jobs.” Women executives see this as good news. They predict that if business attitudes change, equality between men and women in the top business spots may become a reality. That reality may be some time coming, however, considering that in 2003 only 8 percent of the top level jobs in corporate America were held by women.
carly fiorina education 2

Carly Fiorina Education

As chairman and chief executive officer (CEO) of Hewlett-Packard (HP), a technology company worth $72 billion, Carly Fiorina is the most powerful woman in American business. Many give credit to the savvy businesswoman for leading the technology titan into the twenty-first century. In 2002 Fiorina cemented her reputation as a risk taker when she engineered a controversial merger between HP and Compaq Computers. After expanding her empire, Fiorina was sitting at the helm of the second largest computer company in the world. By the mid-2000s, however, given HP's shaky numbers, critics wondered if Fiorina's reign would continue. Regardless, her role in history as a trailblazer would remain. When she joined Hewlett-Packard in 1999, Fiorina became the only woman to head a large, publicly held company in the United States.

Carly Fiorina Education

Carly Fiorina Education
Carly Fiorina Education
Carly Fiorina Education
Carly Fiorina Education

Published on May 30, 2017 | Under Car | By michael ellis
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